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Things to do before and after you move to Spain

Are you all set to start a new life in Spain? Have you packed and shipped your belongings? It is wonderful that you are armed with all the information and knowledge you need to thrive in a country like Spain. But there are some things you cannot master from reading a guide book. Let’s have a look at some great tips and tricks from the mouths of expats.

Get your paper work done properly: When it comes to dealing with any aspect of Spanish bureaucracy, you have to be way more cautious with documents and photocopies. It is always advisable to double check all documents you may need and also take along what you think you might not need. Keep everything in black and white and file them in proper order.

Have the patience of a saint. Get in touch with a friendly mentor who knows the ins and outs of the system and can help you to successfully get work done. Get the hang of useful reading material. Always make sure you collect all your papers before leaving the desk.

Come to the point: If you are not well-versed with Spanish, communicate in a very simple manner. Superfluous words and heavy use of vocabulary will not at all serve the purpose especially at local stores. So forget those grammar rules and say what you want to say with a sparkling smile.

Birthdays: Many congratulations if it your big day (birthday) but don’t expect people to get you a gift or shower birthday presents on you. Spaniards believes it is good to be old and you are lucky enough to come so far in life. Rather than expecting them to buy you a drink, shout- the treat is on me. If it’s your little one’s birthday, buy him sweets to distribute in school.

Avoid going to the beach in August: Spaniards are on full leisure mode in the month of August. You will find all the beaches chock-a-block with people, long never- ending queues at restaurants and a sea of people waiting for their food to arrive. Instead of getting fed-up, choose to visit outside August.

Be a member of a club: There are plenty of clubs and societies to join in the country of fiesta. it’s better to have a social life outside work and home as most socializing naturally takes place in cafes, bars and restaurants. So open up and see new faces.

Children are a blessing: Children are not only to be heard but they have to be cared for in the best way. Spaniards love to be around kids. They believe every effort should be exerted to promote a child’s well-being and enhance their opportunities to have a happy life. Children are allowed to stay up late during summer holidays. Don’t get irritated if you see a cranky child in a restaurant – it’s the norm.

Schools: Make sure you register your child for the new term in plenty of time and remember that many schools are closed for the long summer holidays.

Be loud and clear: If you want to attract the barperson’s attraction, use polite words. Even if your command of Spanish is not that good, everyone appreciates a trier.

Mind the difference: Many different groups of people have settled in Spain throughout the years so do not refer to Valenciano, Gallego or Catalan as the dialects of Spanish. They all are different languages with their own roots.

When to kiss: Follow a simple rule of thumb to greet people in Spain. Firm handshakes for business associates, two kisses for friends and always wear a smile for strangers. Even if you don’t know Spanish, a smile has the same meaning in all languages.

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